Brand : TOFFLE

CHD Jeans

₹9,999


Denim
Regular Fit 

Patchwork, Embroidered Design
Comes with free pair of boots


Story Behind :
With construction beginning in 1952, the city of Chandigarh was designed and built as the new capital for the Indian Punjab. 

While the plan for the new city and the buildings of Chandigarh’s central Capitol Complex was designed by Le Corbusier primarily from his studio in Paris. 

Before knowledge of Chandigarh’s modernist furniture became widespread outside of India, two French antiques dealers, Eric Touchaleaume and Gérald Moreau, embarked on an enterprise from 1999 to buy, transport, restore, promote and finally re-sell this furniture to a Western audience. Over the course of the following decade, these dealers purchased an undisclosed number of pieces of furniture at municipal auctions in Chandigarh for undisclosed sums. These pieces were then removed to France where they were professionally restored, before being exhibited at gallery shows put on in part by Touchaleaume’s own Galeries 54, and sold at top auction houses including Christie’s and Sotheby’s for tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of dollars.

Erasure of Indian architects and designers from the story of Chandigarh chairs in these exhibits accompanied a parallel dearth of information on the piece’s larger history in India – their construction from Indian materials, manufacture in the hands of Indian craftspeople, and their 40+ years of use by Indian residents within Chandigarh’s government institutions, workplaces, and schools.

We are suggesting that a narrative around these chairs has been constructed that has shifted from the understanding of this furniture from being Chandigarh chairs to being Jeanneret Chairs, from being functional pieces to luxury design commodities, from being Indian to European, from being objects that were manufactured to being objects of high design,” stated Thandapani during their presentation titled “Chandigarh Chairs: Missing histories”,
What do the homes of Kourtney Kardashian, Giovanna Battaglia Engelbert, and Maja Hoffmann have in common? The iconic teak chairs that Swiss architect Pierre Jeanneret made in the 1950s for Chandigarh, the utopian Indian metropolis masterminded by his cousin Le Corbusier. Later discarded by locals, the seats were swept up by French dealers in the early aughts and rebranded as objects of desire. Today, originals sell for tens of thousands of dollars at auction. But vetted reproductions of two caned seats, a leather-clad armchair, and a dining table are now finally being made by Cassina.

You may also like